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  • Instrument Spotlight

    The following is a fictional personal anecdote about the hydraulophone. The anecdote is designed to incorporate interesting facts about hydraulophones (and bonus facts too!) and leave you with an understanding of an instrument you may have never heard of... Read More
  • Spotlight: Gorge

    use toms. don’t say it art. say it gorge. Read More
  • Mac Miller's GO:OD AM: A Review

    The biggest question for listeners, especially after Faces, was the vibe. What kind of attitude would Mac bring to the project, his first on a major label? Read More
  • Women's Rights by Childbirth: REVIEW

    The first time listening to Women’s Rights by Childbirth was a great moment for me. It takes a while for me to discover the next piece of music I’m going to fall in love with for a couple of months at a time, but when I know, I know. You know? Read More
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Something Important

Something important is the speed control button on youtube under the settings tab. I think Bagelbrat and I discovered its novelty winter term of last year, and began experimenting with it on our radio show Bed Radio Hour. If you didn’t tune into that, which I’m sure you didn’t, you probably haven’t been told that this feature of youtube is life changing. The tab lets you make each song sound a little different and/or pretend to be a DJ or something. You get to change songs and sometimes make them better, or most often, just made them special for you. Here are ten songs I have found that sound interesting with changed speed.
 
 
 
Here are the songs:
 
Move on Up by Curtis Mayfield
.5 Speed
 
Disco/Bery by Warpaint
1.5 Speed
 
The Trip by Still Corners
.5 Speed
 
Sarah by Alex G
1.5 Speed
 
Come and Get Your Love by Redbone
1.25 Speed
 
Losing You by Solange
.5 Speed
 
Ontario Gothic by Foxes in Fiction
1.25 Speed
 
Age of Consent by New Order
.5 Speed
 
Linger by the Cranberries
1.5 Speed
 
Valerie by Amy Winehouse
.5 Speed

German Music: More Than Just Nena

In today’s world, it’s pretty much a given that the charts are going to be dominated by songs in English. Sometimes the occasional Spanish or French song will pop up but for the most part English is what’s in. For that reason, music in other languages, especially German, has been overlooked. No one really thinks about German music because let’s be real, German isn’t the prettiest of languages. I mean Nena is cool and don’t get me wrong I love 99 Luftballons, but how much depth German music really have?

This was all before I enrolled in a German intensive immersion program last summer and I was only allowed to listen to German music for 7 weeks. At the end of those 7 weeks I was very, very pleasantly surprised at what I found. German music is a lot more complex than 99 Luftballons and electronic club music. In fact, in recent years the German music industry has boomed and many young artists and band have started singing and recording in German versus English. The result is  a deep genre of music featuring rock, pop, and rap to name a few.

 

Here are some of my favorite German artists and groups that I would highly recommend:

 

                              

TELE- Founded in Freiburg, this indie-rock band released their debut album Tausend und ein Verdacht in 2000 and since then they have produced three other albums, including my favorite Jedes Tier. Their chill, rock vibe features songs about love and everyday life and greatly draws influence from 80’s rock.

Recommended songs include:

Wir Sind Helden- Another great pop-rock group is Wir Sind Helden. The group, fronted by lead singer Judith Holofernes who also has a solo career, was founded in 2000 and their music’s serious themes often greatly contrast with their upbeat melodies and sound. Wir Sind Helden is also known for their collaboration with other artists, such as Tele.

Recommended songs include:

CRO- One of the German artists that has managed to cross international boundaries, CRO is one of my favorite German singer/rappers. Carlo Waibel, under the stage name CRO and behind his trademark panda mask presents smart, sophisticated lyrics with strong melodies that are catchy and fun to listen to. He has been called the “Future of German rap” and even coined his own genre of hip-hop and rap known as Raop.

Recommended songs include:

Faculty Fireside Week 3: Stevie P!

KRLX is proud to announce that we will be airing an interview with our own President Steven Poskanzer this Sunday, April 17! You can listen to the interview, both online and on FM, from 2-3pm during our new program, Faculty Fireside.

Faculty Fireside is a weekly show where KRLX DJs have a casual conversation with faculty. If you've got a suggestion for who we should interview next, get in touch with programming director Martha Durrett (durrettm at carleton dot edu).

Disco & House Songs You Should Play at Your Next Party

disco

I’m a firm believer that disco and house are criminally underplayed at college parties. While I may love Drake as much as the next guy, I’d like to hear some more variety. If you’re feeling particularly confident (or particularly drunk) the next time you find yourself with an aux cord at a party, here are a couple disco & house tunes that will get people dancing. (If you find your aux cord privileges revoked after your drop one of these tunes, my bad.)     

 Jimmy “Bo” Horne – Let Me (Let Me Be Your Lover)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8HqZ6VKJeI

 Released in ’78, this track manages to encapsulate so much of what I love about disco. Its crisp production, soaring vocals and an inescapable groove is something every disco tune should aspire tune.

 Debbie Jacobs – Don’t You Want My Love - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mi-FqgtQHDo

Debbie Jacobs brings the heat with this disco track. The combination of handclaps and horns makes for an irresistible groove. I would recommend sticking with the shorter single version, the 12” is almost 8 minutes long which leads to it dragging in some places.  

 Hubie Davidson – Sanctified - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AaWxrrJfS5I

 The second release on Midland’s new disco-house label Regraded, Sanctified brings a combination of chopped up samples that culminate brilliantly.    

 Bileo – You Can Win - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoAATtUmvUs

 Probably my favorite disco tune of all time. How can you not love those shuffling drums and swinging horns? Shout-out to the label Athens of the North to reissuing this and so many other Northern Soul classics. 

 Kiki Gyan – Disco Dancer - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uf5UCFw-HzM

In his prime Kiki Gyan was one of the most famous Ghanian musical artists and churned out one killer disco tune after another while hanging out with the likes of Elton John and Mick Jagger. While he would eventually die poor and alone due to an intensive drug addiction, tracks like this one remain a testament to his musical talent. 

 SAINT PEPSI – Better - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYvji5AXOfk

Sure, this is technically ‘nu-disco’ but I can’t help but put such a great tune on this list. With such an incredibly funky and driving bassline there’s no way you can’t start dancing when you hear this song.

KC & The Sunshine Band – Get Down Tonight - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LHEsE9yN2CY

A classic. There’s a reason our parents (grandparents?) bought enough copies of this record to send it to the top of the charts all over the world. 

Unknown Artist – Disco Duck I - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tj5RM5rt9oE

A rework of the 1977 Carolyne Bernier track “Hold Me, Touch Me,” this tune is an absolute pleasure to listen to.   

Crystal Waters – She’s Homeless - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_KztNIg4cvE

A 90s house anthem that I’m positive your parents have danced to at some point in their lives. The catchy and simple “la da dee la da da” chorus lets people who have never even heard this song before sing along.  

 

 

Lesbian Love Anthems of The Carter Family (Or at Least Feminist Jams from the 1930s)

When most people think of the Carter Family they usually think of June Carter Cash, and if they are particularly savvy they recall that they first popularized many songs that Woody Guthrie would go on to rewrite—‘When the World’s on Fire’ became ‘This Land is Your Land’ and ‘Jesse James’ became ‘Jesus Christ’. While these moments of historical context are useful they do not fully explore what The Carter Family means today. Upon a second listening and with an open mind, many of their songs reveal themselves to be more than quintessential folk songs and emerge as heartthrob anthems about the love between two women.

 

I first came to know the carter family when I downloaded some 60+ songs from a blog hosted in the U.K. years ago. At the time I appreciated these recordings for the miracle that they were still readily available and maintained relevance 80 years after their creation. Their simple and sentimental ditties, with a little crackle and distortion underscored for me the eternal struggle of love, which persisted then as it does now.

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Op Ed: Carleton NEEDS a Gogol Bordello Cover Band

Over this past summer I lived at home in a Chicago suburb north of the city. Each morning I rode the Metra into the city for work. As the train stopped at each suburb, a flock of old pressed suits boarded with their briefcases and their coffee. They found their seats and chatted with their professional friends. By the last stops the train was full of suits chatting about finance or whatever with other suits. Sometimes they chatted with their pre-grad summer intern initiates who wore khakis and were interested in what the suits were saying. The suits were the khakis parent’s friends and were very impressed with the khakis. The culture was a distinct bubble, a cycle of nepotism that was a phenomenon to me. Except I was on the train wearing khakis and a button down going to work in the city too.

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CAVERLX Dance

Rap Beef is the New WWE Wrestling

 
 
Everyone loves a good rap beef now and then. It’s another way to get some drama into your life when the 2016 election season is lacking. I feel like in the past few months I’ve been living in some alternate reality, because the recent drama in the hip-hop community has been surreal to say the very least.
Rap beef in 2016 is much different than the ‘90s or even the ‘00s. While there have been a few high-profile diss tracks recently (Drake’s “Back to Back” is currently up for a Grammy), a lot of the beef ends up being some tweet or video online. It’s like some pro-wrestling feud: Rapper A disses Rapper B on the main stage, we then cut to Rapper B fuming offstage, who will then be on stage later and talk about Rapper A. The parallel between the two world was even acknowledged recently when Flo Rida competed in a rap battle (or at least, tried) on WWE. But this weird clip is only one of the several surreal happenings as of late. Here are some of my personal favorites:
 

Deerhunter YouTube Rarities

Deerhunter has been making music, in one form or another, for the last 13 years. Accordingly, their ascension to the top of the indie rock sphere encompasess the entirety of the web 2.0 revolution of the '00s, meaning that a lot of strange Deerhunter music and video is out there on the internet, but is woefully buried in broken Blogspots or abandoned Tumblrs.  As the KRLX board's resident Deerhunter expert, I've decided to take this opportunity to share my personal favorite YouTube content of theirs, as there is a wealth of high quality music out there that has flown well under the radar. Here are my eight favorites:

1. "Spring Hall Convert" 1998 Demo - Yes, you read that right: 1998. Bradford Cox was just 16 years old when he laid this demo down on a 4-track in his bedroom, and it would be another nine years before it evolved into its final form as the eighth track of Cryptograms.  "Spring Hall Convert" is my second-favorite Deerhunter song (behind "Earthquake"), so I was beyond excited when I found this video online. It illustrates how Mr. Cox's tape loops and writing chops were already quite mature... a full four years before the official start of the band.

2. "Spring Hall Convert" Platts Eyott Session - While I'm on the topic of "Spring Hall Convert," I might as well share this fantastic acoustic recording that Bradford Cox laid down all by himself in 2008 on Platts Eyott Island, a nature reserve on the Thames. This rarity was only available on cassette tape to those who came to the Microcastle release party, but luckily it's been reposted in full on YouTube! I love the reworked vocals and the loose "Here Come the Warm Jets"-style playing.

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